What Will Be ON TNA Impact Wrestling Tonight?

TNA Impact Wrestling returns tonight as they are live from the Verizon Arena in Little Rock, Arkansas. You can watch the show starting at 9 PM ET on Spike TV. Immediately after the live show finishes up, then TNA will tape the show for next week.

Here is what is being advertised for tonight’s Impact Wrestling:

- Chris Sabin vs Manik for the X Division Championship
- Aces and Eights vs Main Event Mafia in a six-man tag team match
- Fallout from Dixie Carter and AJ Styles

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Revisiting TNA’s Destination X 2013

destination xThis is the final part in a ongoing series, looking TNA’s product from a non-fan perspective. Check out Week One and Week Two.

Apologies for skipping last-week’s IMPACT WRESTLING (see, you have to bold it like that because it artificially makes the product more exciting). Some stuff happened, sure, but none of it felt terribly important. I know, I know… Rampage Jackson joined the Main Event Mafia last week. Big news. Should have covered it. So here’s my week-late article:

Rampage Jackson was announced last-night as the 5th wrestler celebrity of the NWO Main-Event Mafia. Because out of all the talent on the TNA roster to recruit from, Sting, Samoa Joe, and Kurt Angle felt it best to pick somebody who has never wrestled before to join their Main-Event level squad.

In the words of Damien Sandow: You’re Welcome.

Of course, I made that comment about Rampage Jackson before TNA fired about half of their personnel in series of cost-cutting moves (read: Hulkamania is expensive). So maybe I should cut TNA a little slack.

Last night on Twitter, I was told that Rampage Jackson is the “muscle” of the group, which is why he doesn’t have to wear a suit like everybody else. I can buy that logic. But I don’t understand the booking logic in advertising Destination X as the pay-per-view event of the summer, and then delivering with a series of qualifying matches for next week’s Impact Wrestling.

Right, because it makes the most sense to hold the popular Ultimate X match until the week AFTER your pay-per-view show, which is supposed to highlight the X Division. Of course, when a show in the year 2013 opens up with Hulk Hogan, Bully Ray, and Brooke Hogan, you know that TNA Creative doesn’t quite have its priorities in check. Not that I don’t love me some Bully Ray (his heel schtick never gets old), but at least let him kick off the show with somebody NOT named Hogan Bollea.

Speaking of “kick off the show,” did anybody else notice Taz was missing at commentary? Me either. Moving on…

What was on display was just alright. The Ultimate X triple-threat qualifying matches proved entertaining. Even more entertaining? Listening to me attempt to pronounce Trent Barreta’s real name after a few glasses of wine… (“no, I got it this time – MAR-Soup-E-uhl. Huh? A Kangaroo?”)

The Main Event Mafia at least delivered on their promise to fight Aces and Eights. Or, at least, they tried. Sting, Angle, Joe, Mangus and Rampage all puffed up their chests and called out Bully Ray’s rag-tag Son’s of Anarchy knockoffs. But surprisingly, In one of the most realistic creative decisions in the entire history of professional wrestling, Aces and Eights just refused. Like, “nah, we don’t want to fight. Nevermind.” So what did the Main Event Mafia do? Run backstage, and let professional wrestling’s only Olympic Gold Medalist get kidnapped in the back of a cheap pickup truck. That’ll teach ‘em!

 

 

Don’t worry, Angle was back in about 15 minutes with ZERO explanation of what went down. I’m guessing he just hopped out. I mean, pickup truck beds are wide open – Bully Ray didn’t think through that one very well, did he? Also, is anybody else bothered by the fact that TNA REGULARLY uses kidnapping as a plot device? This is a serious issue. Apparently, backstage security must absolutely suck at all TNA events. If you have an average of one kidnapping plot per year, effectively carried out on high-level athletes all IN THE SAME WRESTLING ORGANIZATION, isn’t it time to do something about it? Maybe look at the guy who walks around as a “lone wolf,” regularly wearing a hoodie and acting depressed. Oh, right, sorry Dixie, forgot about the cost-cutting measures…

Bully Ray and Sabin put together a fun show. Most fun was the unanticipated arrival of Aces and Eights, the Main Event Mafia, the Four Horsemen, Immortal, S.C.U.M., the J.O.B. squad, and the cast of Happy Days. I’m not sure why, but with a smaller wrestling ring and less space around the outside, TNA feels the need to crowd as many people out there as possible.

But in the end, Sabin finally won, and captured the TNA World Heavyweight Championship. Mike Tenay said it was “poetic justice.” I think the hammer in Sabin’s hands probably had something to do with it.

If these past few weeks have taught me anything, it’s that I’m a lot more bitter towards TNA’s product than I realized. Either that, or this sarcasm is a normal reaction that every TNA fan has. I can only imagine how much more entertaining Impact Wrestling would be with the guys from Mystery Science Theater 3000 in the front row…

Agree? Disagree? Still pining for a Hulk Hogan title run in 2013? Just enjoy sarcasm? Let me know in the comments below, or follow me on Twitter @therealwiseman.

Revisiting TNA’s Impact Wrestling: Week 1

impact_wrestling_logo

This is part one of an ongoing series, looking at TNA’s product from a non-fan perspective as it builds towards Destination X. 

Before last night, I hadn’t caught an episode of TNA’s IMPACT Wrestling since 2012. The last major Pay-Per-View I caught was Bound for Glory 2012, back when Aces and Eights revealed it’s (not actual) leader to be Devon, and Jeff Hardy captured the TNA World Heavyweight Championship from Austin Aries.

I didn’t stop watching because I disliked the product. In fact, TNA’s big Summer IMPACT Wrestling push last year was some of the most consistent work in the company’s 11-year history. The shows were entertaining, Austin Aries was a great champion, and the Aces and Eights storyline still had a little teeth to it. My schedule simply got too busy for a Thursday wrestling show.

Unfortunately, I tuned in last night and my first thought was, “well, not much has changed.”

I can’t compare this show to last weeks show, and I have no idea how last night’s events fit into the big TNA picture. But watching that episode of IMPACT Wrestling left me feeling completely indifferent. It wasn’t the in-ring work, which was as solid as ever (including Samoa Joe, who continues to be one of my favorite wrestlers never to step foot in a WWE ring). I’m also a big fan of the Bound for Glory series, which was hyped prominently throughout the night.

It just felt like TNA had too much going on. Moreso, it seemed as though the creative staff didn’t know how to highlight the really important things from the not-so-important things.

Example: Main Event Mafia kicked off the show (which annoys me unto itself). Kurt Angle and Sting hyped that they would be adding a new member by the end of the night. But, when the segment with Samoa Joe took place, it just felt awkward. All three men seemed unclear how to handle the moment, and the announcers fumbled through the call. Wasn’t this supposed to be a big development? Furthermore, have Aces and Eights just given up? They didn’t seem too concerned with tearing apart TNA anymore. If that’s the case, then why are Sting and Kurt Angle so threatened by them?

Every segment seemed to have more than one thing happening at a time. It couldn’t just be a match – it had to be a match AND THEN an interview. Or an in-ring promo, then a backstage segment. And why the heck was Hulk Hogan featured more prominently than the TNA World Heavyweight Champion Bully Ray?

I thought the Austin Aries reveal was a nice surprise. On the other hand, knowing what little I do about recent TNA events, it seemed to completely undermine the whole “X-Division Champion can challenge for the World Heavyweight Championship” scenario. From my understanding, the Chris Sabin X-Division Championship win was a big deal, and it seemed like a great way to build him up to that next level. But watching fake Suicide steal the title in such a ridiculous manner, the stipulation, and thus the title, both lost a little prestige. It seemed like TNA was trying to make this its own Money in the Bank at the cost of the championship.

And by the end of the night, with so much going on, I wasn’t sure what I was supposed to care about.

Yes, WWE has some weak nights too. But it seems to promote its flagship show in such a way that you know what’s important, who to focus on, and what to talk about the next day. All TNA seemed to emphasize was the “more stuff happening” part, and it caused the whole product to suffer.